Minnesota has now cleared over 3,000 unresolved elder abuse complaints around senior care facilities in Minnesota. Relatives of the victims have previously protested over the lack of inaction by Minnesota State Legislature that would have brought elder protection to the fore. The State is also promising to prioritise investigations in to new elder abuse complaints. The cases dated back to January and investigators have now substantiated around 30% of allegations.

The 3,147 elder abuse complaints (maltreatment) at the start of the year also included assisted-living facilities. These facilities supposedly overseen by the state. The final outcomes remain unclear in cases of merit. The Department of Health advised that resolutions can be time consuming as they sometimes have to wait on The State Board of Nursing and others. However the previous delays angered family and relatives as they saw it as potentially blighting criminal prosecutions,

Recent appointments have seen better dialogue between The State Department of Human Services and the Office of Health Facility. Since the start of 2018 Minnesota State has recorded 12,849 complaints i.e. around 400 each week. The States response is a more robust quality improvement process. They are also working to improve complaint response and factors that are under pinning the abuse. An electronic system to process complaints has also been put in place.

As a result investigation times in to elder abuse complaints are being reduced by around two thirds. The determined shift is giving relatives and families a quicker resolution. Much of the blame for the previous ‘dysfunctional’ service was the heaped on the paper based antiquated processing. Families now have assurances that all complaints are taken seriously and they will be responded to in a timely fashion.

The Department of Human Services (DHS) now has new powers over the Office of Health Facility by way of inter agency agreement. The Department of Human Services has been proactive in sending a team to assist OHFC staff which number 55 employees in order to assist clearing the backlog. A critical issue is also that cases need to be responded to promptly due to the age of the victims and that some may forget intrinsic detail.

An enquiry in March also found that poor leadership in the OHFC compounded the process of investigation. The average time OHFC took to investigate maltreatment complaints in the last fiscal year was 140 days. This was more than twice the recognised time under State law (60 days). The Legislative Auditor’s office recorded a critical report earlier in the year. The Department of Health confirms that investigations are now being closed, on average, within 58 days since April.

State health officials have acknowledged there is still room for improvement, irrespective of the positive strides taken towards elder abuse complaints in 2018 alone around one third of complaints were substantiated within the first 7 months.  The balance of complaints were found to be unsubstantiated or inconclusive due to conflicting or inadequate evidence. It is worth noting that the OHFC, in previous years, substantiated even lower numbers of around 20%. A press release praised The Department of Health in eliminating 3000 complaints but elder care advocates and health officials are committed to pressing for more robust reforms to protect seniors.

Despite a strong push by relatives and senior groups a package of measures was not passed by legislature. The packages also received bipartisan support from lawmakers. Improving security and welfare by way of reforms for vulnerable adults and seniors could not be agreed. The Republican-controlled Legislature that had approved changes were then to fall foul of a sprawling budget bill. The successful proposals were criticised by advocates who saw it as a backward step from current law.  Greater transparency around elder abuse complaints and maltreatment is being sought.

The president of Elder Voice Family Advocates feels that reforms are clearly needed citing the 400 elder abuse complaints each week.  Other points and directives of relevance were safeguards against retaliation by facilities and arbitrary eviction. The assisted living industry is now serving twice as many occupants but is subject to far less stringent regulation. Minnesota law to be clarified in order to allow families the right to site cameras within elder care facilities to monitor their loved ones.

The president of Elder Voice Family Advocates feels that reforms are clearly needed citing the 400 elder abuse complaints each week.  Other points and directives of relevance were safeguards against retaliation by facilities and arbitrary eviction. The assisted living industry is now serving twice as many occupants but is subject to far less stringent regulation. Minnesota law to be clarified in order to allow families the right to site cameras within elder care facilities to monitor their loved ones.

RELATED: Elder Abuse – The True Cost

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